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 Home>News Archive>2013>December>Headline News>

October Magic Series Camellia – Ornamental Plant of Week for December 2, 2013

[Image: Orchid October Magic camellia]

New to the plant market a few years ago is the great October Magic series of Camellia hiemalis developed by Bobby Green of Green Nurseries in Fairhope, Ala. Plants include October Magic Bride, October Magic Dawn, October Magic Inspiration, October Magic Orchid, October Magic Rose and October Magic Snow.

Bride is a small, very double, pure pink, flowering shrub with a dense conical growth habit. Mature size is 4 to 6 feet tall by 3 to 4 feet wide. This variety is a profuse bloomer.

Dawn has large rose-form flowers. Blooms are blends of pink and resemble flowers of a Camellia japonica. Plants reach 4 to 6 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide. The variety is ideal as a single specimen or for use as an intermediate hedge. Plants have dark green foliage.

Inspiration is a favorite. It has large double flowers that are white with a narrow maroon margin. New spring foliage is maroon. Plants reach 6 to 8 feet tall and will be 4 to 5 feet wide when mature.

Another favorite is Orchid (pictured), with white to blush, small, semidouble flowers that have orchid pink shades to the petals. Many blooms cover this plant. Plants reach 3 to 5 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide.

Rose has small very double, salmon-rose blooms. This plant is an early bloomer and has a columnar, dense, upright habit. Plants reach 6 to 8 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide.

Snow has large, double, white flowers with a magenta edge. New spring foliage is copper tinged. Plants are compact and mounding but reach 5 to 7 feet tall and 4 to 5 feet wide at maturity.

Success with sasanquas and other dwarf camellias depends on the planting site. Part sun to part shade is best, especially for younger plants. Choose a location that receives four hours to six hours of direct sun in the morning and shade in the afternoon or a spot that receives light, dappled shade throughout the day.

Allen Owings
Rick Bogren

Last Updated: 12/2/2013 3:03:05 PM


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